11/28/2017

What is Programming

Some would say that programming computers is like putting things together that don't have explicit instructions.  You sort of have to figure it out as you go.  Sure past experience is critical in arranging code in specific way to function logically, but more times than not, you have some level of flexibility and creativity to write the code as you see fit.

If you read other people's code, you wonder what they were trying to do, if they used the most practical approach, if they simply got it to work and didn't account for the unexpected, did they document their code by embedding some explanation of what was occurring, to let the next person have some indication when attempting to troubleshoot.

Coding is based on logic, yet flexible enough to add a personal touch.  So perhaps its a blend of science and art, of cognition and creativity, of repetition and free form.

That ain't too bad of a career choice.  Where else you going to find such ambiguity, without necessarily having to deal with people.

11/23/2017

Two robots debate the future of humanity

Interesting video on Robots.  Ben Goertzel has been researching Artificial Intelligence for 30 years, way before mainstream.  He focus on Artificial General Intelligence primarily, rather than Narrow AI, and I've seen many of his video's over the years.  He's got a project OpenCog, found here: https://opencog.org

Enjoy~!


11/05/2017

Humans Apply Bias to Everything Producing Less than Optimal Results

We're the best.  Best?  You're the only one. Yes, but who's counting.

We see what we want to see.  Wear blinders to confirm our bias.  What is bias?  It's our pre-assumed notions of life.

Hey Jon, you wear blue shirts.  I do?  Yes, 10 years ago, you wore blue shirts.  Well, that was 10 years ago.  Now I wear green shirts.  That doesn't align with my bias.  I will continue to think that you wear blue shirts.  I'd rather not adjust to new information, sure it's lazy, but I've already identified this and prefer not to change.

Bias is part of every equation.  You order a cup of coffee.  Some days they are nice.  Other days not.  Why's that.  Perhaps you look like their ex, we'll give your poor service.  Nobody's tracking service levels at a per customer basis, they'll never know.  I'll give you decaf instead of caffeinated.  In my little world, you will suffer.  Now drink your decaf, nobody's the wiser.

Oh, next customer is an old friend, we'll give them extra special service.

Human bias exist everywhere.  Medical offices, schools, you name it.  Special treatment for different people, based on hidden or blatant bias.  That's probably one reason why artificial intelligence is a difficult nut to crack.  Have to account for the "insanity" of humans, where they override logic based on emotions or what have you.

You can program a computer to use 100% logic.  Humans are anything but logical.  Give humans a choice, it will most likely not be based on logic.  At any point along the thought trail, there is human bias, for better or worse.

If you want to simulate human actions tied to thought process, simply identify the best possible solution using logic, and take the worse possible outcome at minimum 50% of the time.

You do know its probably better to pay your mortgage than go to the casino and gamble away your paycheck.  Of course, anyone knows that.  See you, I'm off to the gambling.

Humans use logic, and apply hidden bias to every equation, producing results that make no sense.  Hence, artificial intelligence embedded into robots is a bit complex problem to solve.

And there you have it~!